Electric Power Grid Reliability in a New Era of Energy Development and an Introduction to the Pitt Energy Grid Institute

City: Monroeville

Energy resources and the supply of electric power are significant defining global issues of the 21st century, and play a critical role in our society on many levels. The impact from a new era of energy resource development and the rapidly evolving mix of diverse energy resource portfolios in the 21st century are creating new challenges, and opportunities, for electric power grid infrastructure. Over the past quarter of the 20th century, our nation had under‐invested in technology, infrastructure, research and development, and education in this important area. The impact of these trends today has resulted in a tremendous need not only for technology and infrastructure advancement, but also in the area of workforce development. This seminar will provide an overview of the electric power and energy sector, along with recommendations on solutions to power grid reliability concerns, including the role of advanced power electronics control technologies and the emergence of Direct Current (DC) solutions at all levels of the grid, as well as microgrids and other rapidly evolving development. The discussion will also highlight opportunities for research and development needs, education and training, and future employment in these exciting and dynamic fields, including the leadership role of the Pittsburgh region. The discussion will also provide an introduction to the recently established Energy GRID Institute at the University of Pittsburgh. Speaker(s): Dr. Gregory Reed, Location: Bldg: Westinghouse Energy Research Center Monroeville, Pennsylvania

Electric Power Grid Reliability in a New Era of Energy Development and an Introduction to the Pitt Energy Grid Institute

City: Monroeville

Energy resources and the supply of electric power are significant defining global issues of the 21st century, and play a critical role in our society on many levels. The impact from a new era of energy resource development and the rapidly evolving mix of diverse energy resource portfolios in the 21st century are creating new challenges, and opportunities, for electric power grid infrastructure. Over the past quarter of the 20th century, our nation had under‐invested in technology, infrastructure, research and development, and education in this important area. The impact of these trends today has resulted in a tremendous need not only for technology and infrastructure advancement, but also in the area of workforce development. This seminar will provide an overview of the electric power and energy sector, along with recommendations on solutions to power grid reliability concerns, including the role of advanced power electronics control technologies and the emergence of Direct Current (DC) solutions at all levels of the grid, as well as microgrids and other rapidly evolving development. The discussion will also highlight opportunities for research and development needs, education and training, and future employment in these exciting and dynamic fields, including the leadership role of the Pittsburgh region. The discussion will also provide an introduction to the recently established Energy GRID Institute at the University of Pittsburgh. Speaker(s): Dr. Gregory Reed, Location: Bldg: Westinghouse Energy Research Center Monroeville, Pennsylvania

Why the More Electric Aircraft Needs Power Electronics

City: Monroeville

This first half of this presentation will introduce the More Electric Aircraft concept and investigate the potential benefits of the technology for manned, civilian aircraft. Typical aircraft electrical power systems, electrical power generation arrangements and associated aircraft loads will be described as well as the exciting, future challenges for the aerospace industry. The importance of power electronics as an enabling technology for this step change in aircraft design is considered and examples of typical system designs are discussed. Work undertaken on Motor Design for Green Aircraft Taxiing, Electromagnetically Assisted Aircraft Launching and Electric Actuation for Helicopters will be described as case studies and future challenges for academia and industry will be discussed. The second part of the presentation will consider the improvements required in technology to make the concept of All Electric Flight a feasible option for civilian aircraft in the future. This will include roadmaps and power density targets as well as the technologies which may offer solutions. These technologies include examples of very high power density electrical machines and power electronics using emerging semiconductor devices such as SiC and GaN. Speaker(s): Dr. Patrick Wheeler, Location: Bldg: Westinghouse Energy Center Monroeville, Pennsylvania

Tour of the PITT OHIO – Harmar Terminal 380 Vdc Microgrid

City: Cheswick

Pitt Ohio Trucking is a transportation solutions provider based in Pittsburgh, PA committed to promoting sustainability. All trucking companies understand that the nature of their business has an impact on the environment.  Pitt Ohio continuously pledges to improve the environmental and social sustainability performance of their business. One of the company’s sustainability efforts was to create the region’s first 55,000 square foot, LEED-certified trucking terminal in Cheswick, PA (Harmar Township) composed of 100 dock doors, 150 LED lights, natural light panels, CNG tractors, and electronic forklifts. Pitt Ohio additionally strives to promote the Pittsburgh region as pioneers of the electric power industry.  Pitt Ohio partnered with the University of Pittsburgh and other local Pittsburgh manufacturers including Adam Solar Resources, Aquion Energy, BDA Engineering Inc., Eaton, PCTI, Sargent Electric Company, Universal Electric, and WindStax to retrofit the existing terminal with a 380 Vdc distribution feed to integrate a variety of renewables and serve the terminal lighting load. The activities regarding the development of a DC based microgrid at the Pitt Ohio trucking terminal in Cheswick, PA will be toured. The goal of this program was to create a viable system architecture for integrating the existing AC power system with renewable energy resources (50 kW of solar power and 5 kW of wind power) and 70kWh of batteries distributed through a 380 Vdc backbone to promote future research in sustainable power solutions.  Besides the views of the electrical infrastructure, management will also provide other details as to why the facility promotes sustainability from all facets. Speaker(s): James Fields, Brandon Grainger Location: 1 Rich Hill Road Cheswick, Pennsylvania 15024

Power Source Buffering using a Triangular Modular Multilevel Converter with Energy Storage

City: Monroeville

As power systems throughout the world continue to utilize DC infrastructure within distributed generation solutions and microgrid designs, an effective DC-DC interfacing power electronic device must be developed for managing power flow and power quality levels between a system’s increasingly diversified array of sources and loads. DC-DC power electronic interfaces are continuing to gain increased attention throughout many distribution applications, including the information and communication technology (ICT), electric vehicle, and renewable generation industries. The research effort described herein explores the use of a multi-port DC-DC modular multilevel converter interfacing a dual-input connection of a 380 VDC system and a 42.9 VDC/ 40.7 A photovoltaic panel with a 96 VDC output resistive load. Ultracapacitors are used to power-buffer the input signal and in this application, the inherently intermittent solar panel output. This technology represents the merits of utilizing a singular interfacing device to consolidate the flows between joint generation and load, while maintaining stable output power using a modular energy storage solution. This work details the operation and control of the DC-DC converter and its module-interfaced power buffering solution, and provides design methodologies for the system described. Speaker(s): Alvaro Cardoza, Location: Bldg: Westinghouse Energy Research Center 4350 Northern Pike Monroeville, Pennsylvania 15146

Multi-Terminal VSC HVDC Effective Power Sharing

Room: 6142, Bldg: Sherman and Joyce Bowie Scott Hall

Voltage Sources Converter (VSC) based HVDC is gaining momentum towards a potential multi terminal HVDC grid (MTDC). However there are some unique control challenges in control and protection before a MTDC grid could be made operational. One of them is following a converter outage in a MTDC grid, it is critical that the healthy converter stations share the power mismatch/burden in a desirable way. A fixed value of power-voltage droop in the DC link voltage control loops can ensure proper distribution according to the converter ratings. Here a scheme for adapting the droop coefficients to share the burden according to the available headroom of each converter station is proposed. Advantage of this adaptive (variable) droop scheme for autonomous power sharing is established through transient simulations on an MTDC grid with four bipolar converters and DC cable network with metallic return. Results for both rectifier and inverter outages under two different scenarios are presented. Post-contingency steady-state operating points obtained from transient simulation are shown to be consistent with those derived analytically. Impact of varying droop coefficients on the stability of the MTDC grid is established. An averaged model in Matlab/SIMULINK which has been validated against detailed switched model in EMTDC/PSCAD is used for the stability and modal analysis. Speaker(s): Rajat Majumder, Location: Room: 6142 Bldg: Sherman and Joyce Bowie Scott Hall Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213